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Game Development

QA by Child

I recently published a home project I was working on, an app to teach children to read Hebrew. I wrote it originally to help my son learn to read Hebrew.

A screenshot of “Learn to Read Hebrew Easily”

In an early version my son was very excited to play it. He quickly understood the principle – see a word, then tap one of four emojis this word describes. Every time you tap a right answer, you get a few more points, which in that early version were displayed prominently at the top of the screen.

It took him less than five minutes to find a “cheat” – if you tap the right answer very quickly many times – you get points for every time you tap it, as long as the “correct answer” animation is running and the word is not changed.

It reminds that a few years back I was working on Desti and when I gave that same kid an early version of our iPad app – he broke it in less than 30 seconds just by moving his hand on the screen and touching everything at once.

Generally, if you have a GUI, one of the ways to find issues is to let a kid hack at it. One reason is that GUIs have the curious property that changes take non-zero time, and usually buttons are not disabled once they are initially tapped. As a result – you sometimes get the effect multiple times – which can result in extra score, multiple transitions, repeated actions on now incorrect state, and so on. In the extreme case this can lead to resource exhaustion very quickly and your app crashing. I’ve seen that happen to my app!

What else do you get by giving your app to a child? You can see very quickly if your UI and UX are clear and easy to understand. If you need to explain what needs to be done – it’s not good enough. That’s true in general – and doubly so for a kid. If your kid gets it on their own – you did something right.

More deeply than UX- you can learn if your gamification works. Is your app/game engaging enough? Does it invite gameplay? Does the meta-game encourage repeated plays? It took me a lot of thought to get my reading app to work well – and it’s far from done.

Did you test your app with your kid? What was your experience with that?

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