Small Python Challenge No. 2 – LRU Cache

Caching is easy. Consider the cache I used to optimize the recursive spring:

class _NotInDict(object):
    pass
_NotInDict = _NotInDict()
def cached(func):
    cache = {}
    def wrapper_func(*args):
        prev_result = cache.get(args, _NotInDict)
        if prev_result is _NotInDict:
            result = func(*args)
            cache[args] = result
            return result
        return prev_result
    return wrapper_func

This kind of cache is simple and effective (especially for recursions), and may be used in all sorts of situations. However, sometimes you want a size limited cache. In that case you have to decide on the criterion used to decide which items to throw away. There are many kinds of criteria used, for further reading check out wikipedia.

For now I’d like to discuss the LRU cache though. LRU stands for Least Recently Used, which means that you throw away the items you didn’t use for a long time. Time in this case is measured by actions. I thought of this type of cache when I worked on the recursive spring. Since each step in the ‘recursivation’ used two samples of the previous step, caching was an obvious choice, and if I had to size limit my cache, LRU whould be the type of cache to use, as you could be certain that the older samples would not have to be used until the next drawing.

The challenge for the weekend is to write an LRU cache in Python. The cache has to be general – support hash-able keys and any cache size required. It has to be efficient – in the size of the cache and the time it takes for a lookup and an update. Once the standard requirements have been met, the big competition should be on elegance. I wrote a benchmark implementation, which is efficient, but not fast. Once I see some solutions, I’ll talk a bit about mine, which is an interesting case-study.

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2 Responses to Small Python Challenge No. 2 – LRU Cache

  1. I guess the main issue here is elegance.
    I would love to see a fast efficient implementation that doesn’t
    implement a linked list in some way.

  2. lorg says:

    You nailed it! That is exactly the issue I was aiming at.
    Erez sent me his solution, and both his solution and mine use linked lists.

    I think that if someone showed me an elegant efficient implementation without a linked list, he’ll be the winner.